This blog consists of politics, philosophy, poetry, history, science, visual art, music, and my own thoughts. This blog is far-right politically and often focuses on the sublimity and power of absolutist, autocratic, and authoritarian regimes
Reblogged from mindblowingscience  1,005 notes

corporisfabrica:

Coronal and ventral x-rays of the hammerhead shark, Sphyrna mokarran.

The distinguishing feature of this animal is, of course, the highly unusual skull shape. You may once have wondered what exactly this seemingly clumsy structure contributes to this fearsome predator, and biologists still do. However, a number of theories exist to explain this unique adaptation; here are some of the best:

  1. All the better to see you with: mounting the eyes at either end of the broad skull allows excellent vision in all areas of the vertical plane. Hammerhead sharks, as hunters of bottom-dwelling animals, can use this superior angle of vision to better locate prey. 
  2. Another pair of fins. The head has evolved into the shape of an effective hydrofoil. It is thought that this may provide greater stability to the shark when making sharp turns and hunting.
  3. Heartbeat sensor. Like many sharks, the hammerhead possesses specialised electrosensory organs called the ampullae of Lorenzini. With these, it can detect the magnetic activity of the Earth and find its heading by means of biological compass. Much more impressively, the hammerhead can detect the minuscule electrical activity emitted by the muscle contractions of its prey, allowing location even when hidden from sight. Almost like a skull-mounted metal detector, the shark may sweep the seabed. All it takes is a heartbeat to give the game away. 

Photo credit to Dan Anderson.

Reblogged from portionsofeternity  8,684 notes

Find meaning. Distinguish melancholy from sadness. Go out for a walk. It doesn’t have to be a romantic walk in the park, spring at its most spectacular moment, flowers and smells and outstanding poetical imagery smoothly transferring you into another world. It doesn’t have to be a walk during which you’ll have multiple life epiphanies and discover meanings no other brain ever managed to encounter. Do not be afraid of spending quality time by yourself. Find meaning or don’t find meaning but “steal” some time and give it freely and exclusively to your own self. Opt for privacy and solitude. That doesn’t make you antisocial or cause you to reject the rest of the world. But you need to breathe. And you need to be. By Albert Camus, Notebooks 1951-1959 (via novemberkind)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

In the dark of the ocean, some animals have evolved to use bioluminescence as a defense. In the animation above, an ostracod, one of the tiny crustaceans seen flitting near the top of the tank, has just been swallowed by a cardinal fish. When threatened, the ostracod ejects two chemicals, luciferin and luciferase, which, when combined, emit light. Because the glow would draw undesirable attention to the cardinal fish, it spits out the ostracod and the glowing liquid and flees. Check out the full video clip over at BBC News. Other crustaceans, including several species of shrimp, also spit out bioluminescent fluids defensively. (Image credit: BBC, source video; via @amyleerobinson)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

In the dark of the ocean, some animals have evolved to use bioluminescence as a defense. In the animation above, an ostracod, one of the tiny crustaceans seen flitting near the top of the tank, has just been swallowed by a cardinal fish. When threatened, the ostracod ejects two chemicals, luciferin and luciferase, which, when combined, emit light. Because the glow would draw undesirable attention to the cardinal fish, it spits out the ostracod and the glowing liquid and flees. Check out the full video clip over at BBC News. Other crustaceans, including several species of shrimp, also spit out bioluminescent fluids defensively. (Image credit: BBC, source video; via @amyleerobinson)