This blog consists of politics, philosophy, poetry, history, science, visual art, music, and my own thoughts. This blog is far-right politically and often focuses on the sublimity and power of absolutist, autocratic, and authoritarian regimes
Reblogged from genghis-khanye  190 notes
archaicwonder:

5th Legion Roman Gold Officer’s Ring, 2nd-3rd Century AD
The 5th Macedonian Legion (Legio V Macedonia) was founded in the year 43 BC by Octavian, the later Augustus, and Consul Gaius Vibius Pansa Caetroniasus. It existed in Moesia until the 5th century.  The 5th Legion was one of the original 28 legions raised by Octavian. It is also the longest lived Roman Legion, spanning 680 years from 43 BC to 637 AD.
Moesia was an ancient region and later Roman province situated in the Balkans, along the south bank of the Danube River. It included most from the territory of modern-day Serbia (without Vojvodina) and the northern parts of the Republic of Macedonia, (Moesia Superior), as well Northern Bulgaria and Romanian Dobrudja, (Moesia Inferior).
The ring is a tapered shank with rectangular panel. Nielloed inscription “LEG V MAC” between two swastikas on top.
More about the 5th Macedonian Legion…

archaicwonder:

5th Legion Roman Gold Officer’s Ring, 2nd-3rd Century AD

The 5th Macedonian Legion (Legio V Macedonia) was founded in the year 43 BC by Octavian, the later Augustus, and Consul Gaius Vibius Pansa Caetroniasus. It existed in Moesia until the 5th century.  The 5th Legion was one of the original 28 legions raised by Octavian. It is also the longest lived Roman Legion, spanning 680 years from 43 BC to 637 AD.

Moesia was an ancient region and later Roman province situated in the Balkans, along the south bank of the Danube River. It included most from the territory of modern-day Serbia (without Vojvodina) and the northern parts of the Republic of Macedonia, (Moesia Superior), as well Northern Bulgaria and Romanian Dobrudja, (Moesia Inferior).

The ring is a tapered shank with rectangular panel. Nielloed inscription “LEG V MAC” between two swastikas on top.

More about the 5th Macedonian Legion…

Reblogged from vulturehooligan  41 notes

I tell you that the injustice of it all is enough to drive one mad. How can a man stomach the cynical or ignorant drivel of liberals as they whine for “freedom of speech” and “right to dissent” and shake their bony fists at “conformity” and all the rest of their legerdemain when one knows that these moral cripples and ethical perverts demand their peculiar freedoms only for those who are working to destroy the West? We have seen their reaction when one committed to saving the West is in need of some of their medicine. By   Francis Parker Yockey. (via vulturehooligan)

Reblogged from ecologybiology  9 notes
harveytjones:

This is a Jewel Moth larvae. They sort of like a cross between a catepillar and a slug. 

This this gorgeous thing turns into a flying moth! It looks like a gummy candy hahaha

Photo via @sciam

#biology #insects #bugs #animals #nature #picoftheday

harveytjones:

This is a Jewel Moth larvae. They sort of like a cross between a catepillar and a slug.

This this gorgeous thing turns into a flying moth! It looks like a gummy candy hahaha

Photo via @sciam

#biology #insects #bugs #animals #nature #picoftheday

Reblogged from vulturehooligan  54 notes

Without honour, life is impossible, not only worthless, but impossible to maintain. A man cannot live with shame; which in the old sense means far more than now, — the “can not” is equal to “is not able to”. As the life is in the blood, so actually the life is in honour; if the wound be left open, and honour suffered to be constantly oozing out, then follows a pining away, a discomfort rising to despair, that is nothing but the beginning of the death struggle itself. By    Vilhelm Grønbech - The Culture of the Teutons. (via vulturehooligan)

Let mystery have its place in you; do not be always turning up your whole soil with the plowshare of self–examination, but leave a little fallow corner in your heart ready for any seed the winds may bring, and reserve a nook of shadow for the passing bird; keep a place in your heart for the unexpected guests, an altar for the unknown God. Then if a bird sings among your branches, do not be too eager to tame it. If you are conscious of something new – thought or feeling, wakening in the depths of your being – do not be in a hurry to let in light upon it, to look at it; let the springing germ have the protection of being forgotten, hedge it round with quiet, and do not break in upon its darkness; let it take shape and grow, and not a word of your happiness to any one! Sacred work of nature as it is, all conception should be enwrapped by the triple veil of modesty, silence and night. By Henri–Frédéric Amiel (via hierarchical-aestheticism)

Self-love is the greatest of flatterers. Whatever discoveries have been made in the region of self-love, there remain many unexplored territories there. Self love is more cunning than the most cunning man in the world… In the human heart there is a perpetual generation of passions; so that the ruin of one is almost always the foundation of another… The attachment or indifference which philosophers have shown to life is only the style of their self love, about which we can no more dispute than of that of the palate or of the choice of colours… Happiness is in the taste, and not in the things themselves; we are happy from possessing what we like, not from possessing what others like… Interest is the soul of self-love, in as much as when the body deprived of its soul is without sight, feeling or knowledge, without thought or movement, so self-love, riven so to speak from its interest, neither sees, nor hears, nor smells, nor moves; thus it is that the same man who will run over land and sea for his own interest becomes suddenly paralyzed when engaged for that of others; from this arises that sudden dullness and, as it were, death, with which we afflict those to whom we speak of our own matters; from this also their sudden resurrection when in our narrative we relate something concerning them; from this we find in our conversations and business that a man becomes dull or bright just as his own interest is near to him or distant from him…

It is difficult to define love; all we can say is, that in the soul it is a desire to rule, in the mind it is a sympathy, and in the body it is a hidden and delicate wish to possess what we love—Plus many mysteries… Jealousy is in a manner just and reasonable, as it tends to preserve a good which belongs, or which we believe belongs to us, on the other hand envy is a fury which cannot endure the happiness of others… There is no passion wherein self-love reigns so powerfully as in love, and one is always more ready to sacrifice the peace of the loved one than their own… Neither love nor fire can subsist without perpetual motion; both cease to live so soon as they cease to hope, or to fear… If we think we love for love’s sake we are much mistaken…

Interest sets at work all sorts of virtues and vices… We can love nothing but what agrees with us, and we can only follow our taste or our pleasure when we prefer our friends to ourselves; nevertheless it is only by that preference that friendship can be true and perfect… We do not regret the loss of our friends according to their merits, but according to OUR wants, and the opinion with which we believed we had impressed them of our worth… What we call liberality is often but the vanity of giving, which we like more than that we give away… Everyone seeks to find his pleasure and his advantage at the expense of others. We prefer ourselves always to those with whom we intend to live, and they almost always perceive the preference. It is this which disturbs and destroys society. We should discover a means to hide this love of selection since it is too ingrained in us to be in our power to destroy. We should make our pleasure that of other persons, to humour, never to wound their self-love.

By François VI, Duc de La Rochefoucauld, Prince de Marcillac

"We step and do not step into the same rivers; we are and are not… Change is unchanging… In change is rest… Couples are things whole and not whole, what is drawn together and what is drawn asunder, the harmonious and discordant. The one is made up of all things, and all things issue from the one… A mixture separates when not kept in motion.

This world, which is the same for all, no one of gods or men has made; but it was ever, is now and ever shall be an ever-living fire, with measures kindling and measures going out… The way up and the way down are one and the same.The straight and the crooked path are one in the same. Good and evil are the same. The beginning and end are common… God is day and night, winter and summer, war and peace, surfeit and hunger; but he takes various shapes, just as fire, when it is mingled with spices, is named according to the savour of each… War is the father of all and the king of all; and some he has made gods and some men, some bond and some free… We must know that war is universal and strife is justice, and that all things come into being and pass away through strife… It is the thunderbolt that steers the course of all things. Fire is want and surfeit. In its advance, Fire will judge and convict all things…

Wisdom is one thing. It is to know the thought by which all things are steered through all things… Self-control is the highest virtue, and wisdom is to speak truth and consciously to act according to nature. All men are have the capacity to come to know themselves and to have self-control.

It is wise for those who hear, not me, but the universal Reason, to confess that all things are one. So we must follow the universal, yet the many live as if they had a wisdom of their own. Though wisdom is common, yet the many live as if they had a wisdom of their own.”

By Heraclitus

All things were together, infinite both in greatness and in smallness; for the small too was infinite. And, when all things were together, none of them could be distinguished in their smallness. For air and aether prevailed over all things, both of them being infinite; for amongst all things these are the greatest both in quantity and size…
And since these things are so, we must suppose that many things of all sorts are contained in the things that are uniting, seeds of all things, with all sorts of shapes and colours and savours, and men have been formed in them, and the other animals that have life, and these men have inhabited cities and cultivated fields as with us; and they have a sun and a moon and the rest as with us; and their earth brings forth for them many things of all kinds of which they gather the best together into their dwellings, and use. Thus much have I said with regard to separating off, to show that it will not be only with us that things are separated, but elsewhere too.
But before they were separated, when all things were together, no colour was distinguishable; for the mixture of all things prevented it—of the moist and the dry; and the warm and the cold, and the light and the dark, and of much that was on earth, of a multitude of innumerable seeds unlike each other. For no thing is like any other. And these things being so, we must hold that all things are whole.
The things that are in one world are not divided nor cut off from one another with a hatchet, neither the warm from the cold nor the cold from the warm as these things revolve and are separated by force and speed. And the speed makes the force. Their speed is not like the speed of any of the things that are now among men, but in every way many times as fast…
All other things partake in a portion of everything, while Nous is infinite and self-ruled, and is mixed with void, is alone itself by itself. For if it were not by itself, but were mixed with anything else, it would partake in all things; for in anything there is a portion of everything… and the things mixed with it would hinder it, so that it would have power over nothing in the same way that it has now being alone by itself. For it is the thinnest of all things and the purest, and it has all knowledge about everything and the greatest strength; and Nous has power over all things, both greater and smaller, that have life. And Nous had power over the whole revolution, so that it began to revolve in the beginning. And it began to revolve first from a small beginning; but the revolution now extends over a larger space, and will extend over a larger still. And all the things that are mingled together and separated off and distinguished are all known by Nous. And Nous set in order all things that were to be, all things that were and are not now and that are, this revolution in which now revolve the stars and the sun and the moon, and the air and the aether that are separated off. And this revolution caused the separating off, and the rare is separated off from the dense, the warm from the cold, the light from the dark, and the dry from the moist. And there are many portions in many things. But no thing is altogether separated off nor distinguished from anything else except Nous. And all Nous is alike, both the greater and the smaller; while nothing else is like anything else, but each single thing is and was most manifestly those things of which if has most in it.
And when Nous began to move things, separation took place from all that was moved, just much as Nous set in motion was separated. And as things were set in motion and separated, the revolution caused them to be separated much more. By Anaxagoras