This blog consists of politics, philosophy, poetry, history, science, visual art, music, and my own thoughts. This blog is far-right politically and often focuses on the sublimity and power of absolutist, autocratic, and authoritarian regimes

When the ego comes to terms with itself it is liable the recognize the loss of all that is has held dear. With development comes a sight of the ruins of potential structures that could have been. Sometimes this can inspire one to create anew. The truly self-respectful soul will learn to face shamefulness, becoming shameless as such.

Reblogged from realmonstrosities  1,482 notes

s-c-i-guy:

Kunstformen der Natur

Kunstformen der Natur (Art Forms of Nature) is a book of lithographic and autotype prints by German biologist Ernst Haeckel. Originally published in sets of ten between 1899 and 1904 and collectively in two volumes in 1904, it consists of 100 prints of various organisms, many of which were first described by Haeckel himself. Over the course of his career, over 1000 engravings were produced based on Haeckel’s sketches and watercolors; many of the best of these were chosen for Kunstformen der Natur, translated from sketch to print by lithographer Adolf Giltsch.

According to Haeckel scholar Olaf Breidbach (the editor of modern editions of Kunstformen), the work was “not just a book of illustrations but also the summation of his view of the world.” The over-riding themes of the Kunstformen plates are symmetry and organization. The subjects were selected to embody organization, from the scale patterns of boxfishes to the spirals of ammonites to the perfect symmetries of jellies and microorganisms, while images composing each plate are arranged for maximum visual impact.

1. Jellyfish: Jellyfish or jellies are the major non-polyp form of individuals of the phylum Cnidaria. They are typified as free-swimming marine animals consisting of a gelatinous umbrella-shaped bell and trailing tentacles. The bell can pulsate for locomotion, while stinging tentacles can be used to capture prey.

2AnnelidThe annelids formally called Annelida are a large phylum of segmented worms, with over 2,000 modern species including ragworms, earthworms and leeches. They are found in marine environments from tidal zones to hydrothermal vents, in freshwater, and in moist terrestrial environments.

3. Cephalopod:  A cephalopod is any member of the molluscan class Cephalopoda. These exclusively marine animals are characterized by bilateral body symmetry, a prominent head, and a set of arms or tentacles modified from the primitive molluscan foot.

4. CopepodCopepods are a group of small crustaceans found in the sea and nearly every freshwater habitat. Some species are planktonic (drifting in sea waters), some are benthic (living on the ocean floor), and some continental species may live in limno-terrestrial habitats and other wet terrestrial places, such as swamps, under leaf fall in wet forests, bogs, springs, ephemeral ponds and puddles, damp moss, or water-filled recesses (phytotelmata) of plants such as bromeliads and pitcher plants. Many live underground in marine and freshwater caves, sinkholes, or stream beds. Copepods are sometimes used as bioindicators.

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Reblogged from realmonstrosities  2,400 notes

cmog:

Interested in seeing the design drawings for these invertebrates?

The Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka archive in the Rakow Research Library includes over 900 original art drawings of plants and invertebrate animals made as studies for the glass models.

Check out the digital archive >

archiemcphee:

We share all sorts of amazing things that aren’t what they seem at the Geyser of Awesome. Here’s another one, and it’s a doozy:

You may think you’re looking at photos of beautiful undersea invertebrates, but these delicate beauties are actually models made of clear, coloured, and painted glass. Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka, a father and son team of master glassmakers (previously featured here), painstakingly created these extraordinary glass models of invertebrate animals (jellyfish, snails, sea anemones, corals, hidroids, starfish, sea-cucumbers, squid, seaslugs and bivalves) from the mid 1800s until the 1930s.

Photographer Guido Mocafico visited the natural history museums which still house collections of the Blaschka’s work, including Harvard University Herbaria, the Corning Museum of Glass/Cornell University, and the Natural History Museums in London and Ireland, in order to create a marvelous series of photographs celebrating these exquisite models. He set the pieces against dark backdrops and carefully lit them to emphasize their different colours and textures.

As you can see here, the results that Guido Mocafico achieved for his travel and effort are completely wonderful. Click here to view more.

[via Faith is Torment]

Reblogged from dunsanian  44 notes

Women’s liberation, if not the most extreme then certainly the most influential neo-Marxist movement in America, has done to the American home what communism did to the Russian economy, and most of the ruin is irreversible…By defining relations between men and women in terms of power and competition instead of reciprocity and cooperation, the movement tore apart the most basic and fragile contract in human society, the unit from which all other social institutions draw their strength. By Ruth Wisse (via madamescherzo)

georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov:

Wilhelm I, Frederick III, and Wilhelm II, as well as the young crown prince Wilhelm. When Wilhelm I died in 1888, his son was assumed to be a much more progressive force in Germany. The old guard was threatened by his liberal tendencies, but would have little to worry about quite ill when he assumed the throne, he passed away within only a few months, leaving his young son Wilhelm II to rule as Kaiser.
Wilhelm took more to the traditional Prussian outlook of his grandfather than the modernizing culturalism of his father, heavily influenced by Bismarck’s tutelage. He set Germany on an antagonistic foreign policy and his desire to see Germany become a naval power saw the nation enter into a naval arms race with the United Kingdom. Although related to most of the crowed heads of state in Europe, he managed to alienate most of them during his reign, perhaps most disastrous being the British, whom he had believed to be natural friends of Germany.
When Franz Ferdinand was assassinated in Sarajevo on June 28, 1914, his tactless handling of the affair and his “blank check” backing of Austo-Hungarian reaction would help push the final few steps to war a month later.
(IWM)

georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov:

Wilhelm I, Frederick III, and Wilhelm II, as well as the young crown prince Wilhelm. When Wilhelm I died in 1888, his son was assumed to be a much more progressive force in Germany. The old guard was threatened by his liberal tendencies, but would have little to worry about quite ill when he assumed the throne, he passed away within only a few months, leaving his young son Wilhelm II to rule as Kaiser.

Wilhelm took more to the traditional Prussian outlook of his grandfather than the modernizing culturalism of his father, heavily influenced by Bismarck’s tutelage. He set Germany on an antagonistic foreign policy and his desire to see Germany become a naval power saw the nation enter into a naval arms race with the United Kingdom. Although related to most of the crowed heads of state in Europe, he managed to alienate most of them during his reign, perhaps most disastrous being the British, whom he had believed to be natural friends of Germany.

When Franz Ferdinand was assassinated in Sarajevo on June 28, 1914, his tactless handling of the affair and his “blank check” backing of Austo-Hungarian reaction would help push the final few steps to war a month later.

(IWM)